5.0 Threats 8. parks passes and permits, For teachers, schools and community educators, NSW Threatened Species Scientific Committee, Nomination, assessment, public exhibition and listing, Schedules of the Biodiversity Conservation Act, NSW Threatened Species Scientific Committee publications, Land managers and conservation groups survey, Dry sclerophyll forests (shrub/grass sub-formation), North-west Slopes Dry Sclerophyll Woodlands, Dry sclerophyll forests (shrubby sub-formation), Northern Escarpment Dry Sclerophyll Forests, Northern Tableland Dry Sclerophyll Forests, South Coast Sands Dry Sclerophyll Forests, Southern Tableland Dry Sclerophyll Forests, Sydney Hinterland Dry Sclerophyll Forests, Sydney Sand Flats Dry Sclerophyll Forests, Semi-arid woodlands (grassy sub-formation), Semi-arid woodlands (shrubby sub-formation), Wet sclerophyll forests (grassy sub-formation), Northern Hinterland Wet Sclerophyll Forests, Northern Tableland Wet Sclerophyll Forests, Southern Tableland Wet Sclerophyll Forests, Wet sclerophyll forests (shrubby sub-formation), Northern Escarpment Wet Sclerophyll Forests, Southern Escarpment Wet Sclerophyll Forests, Guidelines: Planting to conserve threatened nomadic pollinators in NSW, Nectar food trees - factsheet A nocturnal arboreal marsupial, the mahogany glider closely resembles the sugar glider, the squirrel glider and the yellow-bellied glider, but is noticeably larger than any of its relatives (26.5 cm long and 410 g) and has a long tail (34–40 cm). and learn, Connection They are also widely distributed throughout the coastal side of the Great Dividing Range, between southern Queensland and … 2002) 10 There is a significant drop in the abundance of Squirrel gliders when the vegetation strip width drops bellow 40 meters (Van der Ree 2000). The squirrel glider (Petaurus norfolcensis), which is the subject of this thesis, provides a good example of a species where conservation planning is required. The form can be submitted directly to Lou Bull or you can print it out and post the completed form to Petaurus. management, Park The sugar glider is very similar in appearance to a flying squirrel, but it is in no way related. Squirrel Glider Petaurus norfolcensis Description and Distribution The Squirrel Glider Petaurus norfolcensis (Kerr 1792) is an arboreal, nocturnal, gliding possum occurring in northern and central Victoria, and through eastern New South Wales and eastern Queensland, to the southern Cape York Peninsula. policies, Commercial If they fall to the ground they are at risk of dying on barb wire fencing, getting hit by … The Sugar glider is a small arboreal nocturnal marsupial mammal. Squirrel Glider LAMP Project Officer has prepared a fact sheet about Squirrel Gliders, their threats and where to find them in the greater Burrumbuttock region.. Squirrel Glider Habitat Management Guide. Appearance. reserves and protected areas, Climate River Red Gum riparian tall woodland / open forest wetland in the Nandewar Bioregion and Brigalow Belt South Bioregion, River Red Gum swampy woodland wetland on cowals (lakes) and associated flood channels in central NSW, River Red Gum tall to very tall open forest / woodland wetland on rivers on floodplains mainly in the Darling Riverine Plains Bioregion, River Red Gum-sedge dominated very tall open forest in frequently flooded forest wetland along major rivers and floodplains in south-western NSW, Weeping Bottlebrush - Rough-barked Apple riparian low open forest / tall shrubland wetland mainly in the Briglaow Belt South Bioregion, Fern-leaf Banksia - Prickly-leaved Paperbark-Tantoon - Leptocarpus tenax wet heath on coastal sands of the Central Coast and lower North Coast, Swamp Gum - Ribbon Gum woodland on poorly-drained flats, South Eastern Highlands Bioregion, Cabbage Gum - Broad-leaved Apple open forest of the eastern escarpment, NSW North Coast Bioregion and South Eastern Queensland Bioregion, Cabbage Gum forest in Sun Valley, Sydney Basin Bioregion, Cabbage Gum open forest or woodland on flats of the North Coast, Cumberland shale - sandstone Ironbark forest, Forest Red Gum - Coast Grey Box shrubby open forest on steep hills in the Bega Valley, South East Corner Bioregion, Forest Red Gum - Rough-barked Apple - White Stringybark grassy woodlands on hills in dry valleys, southern South East Corner Bioregion, Forest Red Gum - Swamp Box of the Clarence Valley lowlands of the NSW North Coast Bioregion, Forest Red Gum - Thin-leaved Stringybark grassy woodland on coastal lowlands, southern Sydney Basin Bioregion, Grey Box - Forest Red Gum - Grey Ironbark open forest of the hinterland ranges of the North Coast, Narrow-leaved Red Gum woodlands of the lowlands of the North Coast, Carbeen +/- Coolabah grassy woodland on floodplain clay loam soil on north-western NSW floodplains, mainly Darling Riverine Plain Bioregion, Mixed box eucalypt woodland on low sandy-loam rises on alluvial plains in central western NSW, Riverine Western Grey Box grassy woodland of the semi-arid (warm) climate zone, Western Grey Box - cypress pine shrub grass shrub tall woodland in the Brigalow Belt South Bioregion, Western Grey Box - Poplar Box - White Cypress Pine tall woodland on red loams mainly of the eastern Cobar Peneplain Bioregion, Western Grey Box - White Cypress Pine tall woodland on loam soil on alluvial plains of NSW South Western Slopes Bioregion and Riverina Bioregion, Western Grey Box tall grassy woodland on alluvial loam and clay soils in the NSW South Western Slopes and Riverina Bioregions, White Cypress Pine woodland on sandy loams in central NSW wheatbelt, Yellow Box - River Red Gum tall grassy riverine woodland of NSW South Western Slopes Bioregion and Riverina Bioregion, Black Sallee plateau low woodland in the southern Brigalow Belt South Bioregion, Blakely's Red Gum - Yellow Box grassy open forest or woodland of the New England Tableland Bioregion, Blakely's Red Gum - Yellow Box grassy woodland of the New England Tableland Bioregion, Broad-leaved Stringybark - Blakely's Red Gum grassy woodlands of the New England Tableland Bioregion, Broad-leaved Stringybark - Yellow Box shrub/grass open forest of the New England Tableland Bioregion, Fuzzy Box open forest of the New England Tableland Bioregion, Long-leaved Box +/- Nortons Box - red gum grassy woodland on hills in the southern Brigalow Belt South Bioregion, New England Peppermint grassy woodland on granitic substrates of the New England Tableland Bioregion, Rough-barked Apple - Cabbage Gum grassy woodland of the New England Tableland Bioregion, Rough-barked Apple riparian forb/grass open forest of the Nandewar Bioregion, Silvertop Stringybark - Yellow Box +/- Nortons Box grassy woodland on basalt hills mainly on northern aspects of the Liverpool Range, Brigalow Belt South Bioregion, Silvertop Stringybark grass/herb forest of the Brigalow Belt South and Nandewar Bioregion and western New England Tableland Bioregion, Silvertop Stringybark open forest of the New England Tableland Bioregion, Yellow Box - Broad-leaved Stringybark shrubby open forest of the New England Tableland Bioregion, Yellow Box - Grey Box - Red Gum woodland of the central eastern parts of the New England Tableland Bioregion, Apple Box - Yellow Box dry grassy woodland of the South Eastern Highlands Bioregion, Blakely's Red Gum - Yellow Box - Rough-barked Apple grassy woodland of the Capertee Valley, Sydney Basin Bioregion, Broad-leaved Peppermint - Red Stringybark grassy open forest on undulating hills, South Eastern Highlands Bioregion, Candlebark - Blakely's Red Gum - Long-leaved Box grassy woodland in the Rye Park to Yass region of the NSW South Western Slopes Bioregion and South Eastern Highland Bioregion, Yellow Box - Blakely's Red Gum grassy woodland on the tablelands, South Eastern Highlands Bioregion, Yellow Box grassy tall woodland on valley flats in the upper slopes of the NSW South Western Slopes Bioregion and South Eastern Highlands Bioregion, Black Sallee grassy woodland of the New England Tableland Bioregion, Candlebark - Ribbon Gum grassy woodland of the New England Tableland Bioregion, New England Peppermint grassy woodland on sedimentary or basaltic substrates of the New England Tableland Bioregion, Ribbon Gum - Mountain Gum - Snow Gum Grassy Forest/Woodland of the New England Tableland Bioregion, Ribbon Gum - Rough-barked Apple - Yellow Box grassy woodland/open forest of the New England Tableland Bioregion and NSW North Coast Bioregion, Snow Gum - Black Sallee grassy woodland of the New England Tableland Bioregion, Snow Gum - Mountain Gum - Mountain Ribbon Gum grassy open forest of the New England Tableland Bioregion, Snow Gum woodland of the New England Tableland Bioregion and NSW North Coast Bioregion, Apple Box - Blakely's Red Gum moist valley and footslopes grass-forb open forest of the NSW South Western Slopes Bioregion. PDF - educators, For community Distribution. [5] They have blue-grey or brown-grey fur on their back and a white belly. 1996). Throughout their range squirrel gliders have not been reported above 300 m (Menkhorst et al., 1988, Bennett et al., 1991, Quin, 1993). Squirrel Sugar Glider habitats effected by Developers or entities clearing land, are required to be offset by securing biodiversity credits. Like most of the wrist-winged gliders, the squirrel glider is endemic to Australia. Sugar gliders looks remarkably similar to the flying squirrels found in the US but in reality, these two animals are extremely different. Squirrel gliders are sparsely distributed in eastern Australia from Cape York Being arboreal, Squirrel gliders are very adept at climbing.They are rarely found on the ground and are able to glide from limb to limb of trees using the membranes of skin that stretches between their front and back legs.They have been observed to glide up to 100 metres with the assistance of a downhill slope and up to 50 metres over flatter terrain. This feature is homologous to the ring tail possum (order of Diprodontia) which use their tail as an extra limb to grab hold of trees. The Squirrel Glider is Dr. Cremona said that while the discovery of a new mammal species was uncommon and exciting, it also meant that the distribution of the sugar glider had been widely overestimated. research licences, Protected maxthrust aggressor sport ep glider 1.5m. air quality data, Air guidelines, Current It also eats pollen, nectar, leaves, and bark. The squirrel glider (Petaurus norfolcensis) is a nocturnal gliding possum. quality research, Water Due to a mistake with the labelling of an early museum specimen, the squirrel glider’s scientific name wrongly refers to Norfolk Island. It is not yet known which species the gliders diverged from. Loss and degradation of habitat from urban development is a key threat to the squirrel glider (Petaurus norfolcensis), because its distribution coincides where most people live in Australia.Squirrel gliders are known to occur in or around urban fringes where native vegetation is retained; however, little is known about specific anthropogenic factors that may affect their persistence. approvals, National The Squirrel Glider is an … From Lindenmayer, D. Ed. Distribution of the Squirrel glider (Left) and distribution of Mahogany glider (Right). councils, For state the OEH Air program, Current new balsa models from max thrust covered and uncovered. While this glider has a wide distribution, it is considered rare throughout most of its range as it has specific habitat requirements. When they glide their prehensile tail can act as a rudder, allowing them to steer which direction they want to go. The sugar glider is a marsupial, most comparable to a kangaroo. network, Search collect. Context Loss and degradation of habitat from urban development is a key threat to the squirrel glider (Petaurus norfolcensis), because its distribution coincides where most people live in Australia. Population dynamics and life history of the mahogany glider, Petaurus gracilis, and the sugar glider, Petaurus breviceps, in north Queensland. [4] They have a flying membrane that extends from their 5th front toe to the back of their foot on both sides. 218KB), Trees with hollows - factsheet It has an extensive distribution in eastern Australia, covering a geographic distance of approximately 3000 km. protected areas, Aboriginal Detecting Squirrel Gliders. Squirrel Gliders often live on private land, so any records of sightings are very important to help us to understand their distribution in the local area of Burrumbuttock and surrounds Squirrel Gliders Squirrel Gliders (Petaurus norfolcensis) are a mid-sized possum, reliant on tree hollows for shelter and nesting. (1999). This model (Figure 2) identifies areas of high medium and low suitability for Squirrel Gliders. Distribution. heritage places, Cultures animals, Threatened local heritage, Development The form can be submitted directly to Lou Bull or you can print it out and post the completed form to Petaurus. Appearance. [5] The offspring will immediately crawl to the mother's marsupium and anchor itself to a teat where it will stay for about 3 months. licences, Native covid-19 update. The fur on the entire belly of the Squirrel Glider is white. 7.0 Research 10. The squirrel glider most likely evolved from a marsupial like a possum that had membranes for gliding. The results of a trapping and spotlighting survey in Victoria coupled with examination of historical records showed that P. norfolcensis is restricted to the Riverine Plains, Northern Uplands and northern slopes of the Western Highlands. pollution, Air Squirrel Glider Petaurus norfolcensis (Kerr 1792). [4], The glider will make a den in the hollow tree and line it with leaves. This model (Figure 2) identifies areas of high medium and low suitability for Squirrel Gliders. Distribution. develop a predictive model of Squirrel Glider distribution in Wyong Shire. The glider occurs in Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia. service providers, NSW The Sugar Glider lives in forests and woodlands. The Squirrel Glider never has a white-tip to the tail found in some Sugar Gliders. cultural heritage, Animals Telling the difference between a sugar glider and a flying squirrel can be quite challenging, so in this post, I have listed all the differences between the two species. Squirrel Glider has gray hair which is tied into twintails. Globally, squirrels are found on every continent except Australia and Antarctica. The distribution of the squirrel glider (Petaurus norfolcensis) extends for 3,000 kilometres along the eastern coast of Australia. Climate Change Fund, Policy Environmental Trust, Awards and 3.0 Distribution 5. air quality, Sydney The squirrel glider's closest relatives come from the same genus, Petaurus, and they include the sugar glider (P. breviceps), mahogany glider (P. gracilis), northern glider (P. abidi), Biak glider (P. biacensis) and yellow-bellied glider (P. australis). However any gaps in the canopy greater than 40 metres can cause a problem. for the environment, Water Distribution The species is widely though sparsely distributed in eastern Australia, from northern Queensland to western Victoria. In flight, the Sugar Glider it uses its long bushy tail for stability and steering. 8.0 Management Intent 11. Distribution, Habitat and Conservation Status of the Squirrel Glider Petaurus-Norfolcensis (Petauridae, Marsupialia) in Victoria January 1988 Wildlife Research 15(1) not yet threatened) by the IUCN.[1]. land and soil, Soil The end of their tail is black and they have a black stripe from their eyes to the mid-back. The predicted distribution of the mahogany glider did not extend outside the known area on the mainland, although the species was predicted to occur over 500 m elevation in some areas within their known range. Both sexes are similar in appearance. Squirrel Glider has gray hair which is tied into twintails. Within the Border Rivers-Gwydir Catchment, this species may be confused with the much smaller (31-41cm), but similarly coloured, Sugar Glider (Petaurus brevipes). maxthrust aggressor ridge glider 1.5m. management, Wildlife Climatic modelling of the distribution of the mahogany glider (Petaurus gracilis), and the squirrel glider (P. norfolcensis). The offspring become independent at 10 months and go off on their own. 9.0 Further Information 14. and manage, Search However, due to large population sizes and occurrence in several protected areas, the species is currently classified as Least Concern (i.e. [6] The litter sizes are usually one to two offspring a year. our heritage, Supporting Squirrel Gliders are also less vocal than Sugar Gliders. Areas of high and medium suitability occur in warmer climates of the coastal plains and are dominated by winter flowering vegetation communities Often compared with flying squirrels—rodents with similar bodies that can also glide—sugar gliders are more closely related to other marsupials like kangaroos. [6] They can glide up to 50m from tree to tree. of protected areas, Establishing Distribution of the Squirrel glider (Left) and distribution of Mahogany glider (Right). Squirrel gliders (Petaurus norfolcensis) are an icon species in the Burrumbuttock area in southern NSW.While this glider has a wide distribution, it is considered rare throughout most of its range as it has specific habitat requirements. They also occur on Fraser Island, North and South Stradbroke Island, Moreton Island and Ricketts Island. Each fades into black at the end - at the front, her hair has a black line in the middle, her middlemost bang fades into pink, and the corner of both her side bangs fades into beige. Malekian, M, Cooper, S & Carthew, SM 2006, ' An extension to the known distribution of the squirrel glider Petaurus norfolcensis in Australia ', Australian Mammalogy, vol. The new information about the distribution of squirrel gliders raises questions about the most effective approach, including the spatial scale, at which to manage and recover widespread but vulnerable species. Queensland Museum South Bank, QMSB, Queensland Museum, QM We acknowledge the First Peoples – the Traditional Owners of the lands where we live and work, and we recognise their continuing connection to land, water and community. complete this survey. protected areas, Park overview; data; media; articles; maps; names An extension to the known distribution of the squirrel glider Petaurus norfolcensis in Australia. and download data, Understanding "The Squirrel Glider - a gliding flyer - pictures and facts", "ADW: Petaurus norfolcensis: INFORMATION", Wildlife Preservation Society of Queensland, Elizabeth Ann Flaherty: Locomotor performance and cost of transport in the squirrel glider, Petaurus Norfolcensis (Petauridae) (pdf), https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Squirrel_glider&oldid=993719607, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 12 December 2020, at 03:07. The range of Squirrel gliders cover a huge area, stretching along the east coast of Australia, from Cape York Peninsula (Queensland) to central Victoria. Complete a squirrel glider survey. Squirrel gliders are often mistaken for flying squirrels of North America. 235-238. publications, Soil 4.0 Ecology 6. Habitat. Blakely's Red Gum - White Box - Yellow Box - Black Cypress Pine box grass/shrub woodland on clay loam soils on undulating hills of central NSW South Western Slopes Bioregion, Blakely's Red Gum - White Cypress Pine - Rough-barked Apple grassy open forest of drainage lines of the northern Nandewar Bioregion and New England Tableland Bioregion, Blakely's Red Gum - White Cypress Pine woodland on footslopes of hills in central part of the NSW South Western Slopes Bioregion, Blakely's Red Gum - Yellow Box grassy tall woodland of the NSW South Western Slopes Bioregion, Blakely's Red Gum - Yellow Box grassy tall woodland on flats and hills in the Brigalow Belt South Bioregion and Nandewar Bioregion, Carbeen - White Box +/- Silver-leaved Ironbark grassy tall woodland on basalt hills, Brigalow Belt South Bioregion, Derived Spear Grass - Slender Bamboo Grass mixed tussock grassland mainly of the northern Brigalow Belt South Bioregion and Nandewar Bioregion, Derived speargrass - wallaby grass - wire grass mixed forb grassland mainly in the Coonabarabran - Pilliga - Coolah region, Fuzzy Box Woodland on alluvial brown loam soils mainly in the NSW South Western Slopes Bioregion, Fuzzy Box woodland on colluvium and alluvial flats in the Brigalow Belt South Bioregion (including Pilliga) and Nandewar Bioregion, Grey Box - Blakely's Red Gum - Yellow Box grassy open forest of the Nandewar Bioregion and New England Tableland Bioregion, Grey Box grassy woodland or open forest of the Nandewar Bioregion and New England Tableland Bioregion, Herbaceous White Box - Apple Box valley woodland of the NSW central western slopes, Long-leaved Box - Red Box grass-shrub open forest on hillslopes in the Mudgee Region, NSW central western slopes, Mugga Ironbark - Black Cypress Pine woodland on hillslopes and ridges of the Central Lachlan region of the NSW South Western Slopes Bioregion, Narrow-leaved Ironbark - Forest Red Gum woodland on rocky slopes of the lower Burragorang Gorge, Sydney Basin Bioregion, Nortons Box - Red Box - Red Stringybark +/- Nodding Flax Lily forb-grass open forest mainly on the Tumut region, Queensland Bluegrass - Redleg Grass - Rats Tail Grass - spear grass - panic grass derived grassland of the Nandewar Bioregion and Brigalow Belt South Bioregion, Red Box - Blakely's Red Gum sedge woodland on colluvial clay drainage lines in the NSW South Western Slopes Bioregion, Red Box - White Box +/- Red Stringybark hill woodland in the NSW South Western Slopes Bioregion, Red Stringybark - Blakely's Red Gum - tea tree herbaceous swampy valley open forest of the southern NSW South Western Slopes Bioregion, Red Stringybark - Blakely's Red Gum +/- Long-leaved Box shrub/grass hill woodland of the NSW South Western Slopes Bioregion, Red Stringybark - Kurrajong - mixed eucalypt grassy open forest of the Coonabarabran - Gulgong region in the Brigalow Belt South and NSW SWS Bioregion, Riparian Blakely's Red Gum - box - shrub - sedge - grass tall open forest of the central NSW South Western Slopes Bioregion, Rough-Barked Apple - red gum - Yellow Box woodland on alluvial clay to loam soils on valley flats in the northern NSW South Western Slopes Bioregion and Brigalow Belt South Bioregion, Rough-barked Apple - White Cypress Pine - Blakely's Red Gum riparian open forest / woodland of the Nandewar Bioregion and New England Tableland Bioregion, Silver-leaved Ironbark - White Cypress Pine grassy woodland mainly in the northern Nandewar Bioregion, Silver-leaved Ironbark grassy tall woodland on clay-loam soils on plains in the Brigalow Belt South Bioregion, Tumbledown Gum woodland on hills in the northern NSW South Western Slopes Bioregion and southern Brigalow Belt South Bioregion, White Box - Black Cypress Pine - red gum +/- Mugga Ironbark shrubby woodland in hills of the NSW central western slopes, White Box - Blakely's Red Gum - Long-leaved Box - Nortons Box - Red Stringybark grass-shrub woodland on shallow soils on hills in the NSW South Western Slopes Bioregion, White Box - Blakely's Red Gum shrub/grass woodland on metamorphic hillslopes in the mid-southern part of the upper slopes sub-region of the NSW South Western Slopes Bioregion, White Box - Rough-barked Apple alluvial woodland of the NSW central western slopes including in the Mudgee region, White Box - White Cypress Pine - Silver-leaved Ironbark grassy woodland on mainly clay loam soils on hills mainly in the Nandewar Bioregion, White Box - White Cypress Pine - Western Grey Box shrub/grass/forb woodland in the NSW South Western Slopes Bioregion, White Box grass shrub hill woodland on clay to loam soils on volcanic and sedimentary hills in the southern Brigalow Belt South Bioregion, White Box grassy woodland in the upper slopes sub-region of the NSW South Western Slopes Bioregion, White Box grassy woodland of the Nandewar Bioregion and Brigalow Belt South Bioregion, White Box grassy woodland on the Inverell basalts mainly in the Nandewar Bioregion, White Box grassy woodland to open woodland on basalt flats and rises in the Liverpool Plains sub-region, BBS Bioregion, White Cypress Pine - Silver-leaved Ironbark grassy woodland of the Nandewar Bioregion, Yellow Box - Blakely's Red Gum grassy woodland of the Nandewar Bioregion, Yellow Box - White Cypress Pine alluvial terrace flats grassy woodland in the Pilliga forests and surrounds, Brigalow Belt South Bioregion, Yellow Box grassy tall woodland on alluvium or parna loams and clays on flats in NSW South Western Slopes Bioregion, Coastal headland heaths of the NSW North Coast Bioregion, Coastal mallee of the NSW North Coast Bioregion, Coastal heath on sands of the NSW North Coast Bioregion, Hairpin Banksia - Slender Tea-tree heath on coastal sandstone plateaux, Sydney Basin Bioregion, Scribbly Gum - Hairpin Banksia - Dwarf Apple heathy woodland on hinterland sandstone plateaux of the Central Coast, Sydney Basin Bioregion, Banksia - Red Bloodwood - Hard-leaved Scribbly Gum heathy open woodland on sandstone plateaux, southern Sydney Basin Bioregion, Banksia dry shrubland on coastal sands of the NSW North Coast Bioregion, Black Box - Lignum woodland wetland of the inner floodplains in the semi-arid (warm) climate zone (mainly Riverina Bioregion and Murray Darling Depression Bioregion), Black Box grassy open woodland wetland of rarely flooded depressions in south western NSW (mainly Riverina Bioregion and Murray Darling Depression Bioregion), Dwyer's Red Gum - Currawang grassy low woodland of the central western plains of NSW, Mugga Ironbark -Tumbledown Red Gum - Red Box - Black Cypress Pine open forest on shallow stony soils on hills in the NSW South Western Slopes Bioregion, Red Ironbark - Black Cypress Pine shrubby woodland of the NSW South Western Slopes Bioregion, Red Ironbark - Red Stringybark - Tumbledown Gum heath low woodland on ridges, central NSW South Western Slopes, Tick Bush - Drooping She Oak tall shrubland on granite hills of the NSW central western slopes, Tumbledown Red Gum - Black Cypress Pine - Red Stringybark woodland on rocky hills in the NSW central western slopes, Yellow Box - White Cypress Pine grassy woodland on deep sandy-loam alluvial soils of the eastern Riverina Bioregion and western NSW South Western Slopes Bioregion, Blackbutt - Rough-barked Apple - Turpentine - ferny tall open forest of the Central Coast, Blackbutt - Tallowwood dry grassy open forest of the central parts NSW North Coast Bioregion, Blackbutt - Turpentine open forest of the foothills of the NSW North Coast Bioregion, Blackbutt grassy open forest of the lower Clarence Valley of the NSW North Coast Bioregion, Pink Bloodwood - Thin-leaved Stringybark - Grey Ironbark shrub - grass open forest on ranges of the lower North Coast, Red Mahogany open forest of the coastal lowlands of the NSW North Coast Bioregion and northern Sydney Basin Bioregion, Rough-barked Apple - Grey Gum grassy open forest of the hinterland hills of the Central Coast, Sydney Basin Bioregion, Small-fruited Grey Gum - Turpentine - Tallowwood moist open forest on foothills of the lower North Coast, Tallowwood - Small-fruited Grey Gum - Kangaroo Grass grassy tall open forest on foothills of the lower North Coast, Tallowwood - Small-fruited Grey Gum dry grassy open forest of the foothills of the NSW North Coast, Tallowwood - Smooth-barked Apple - Blackbutt grass tall open forest of the Central and lower North Coast, Tallowwood open forest of the coastal ranges of the NSW North Coast Bioregion, Dorrigo White Gum open forest of the escarpment ranges of the NSW North Coast Bioregion and New England Tableland Bioregion, Messmate - Silvertop Stringybark - Tussock Grass shrub - grass open forest of western Barrington Tops, Mountain Ribbon Gum - Messmate open forest of escarpment ranges of the NSW North Coast Bioregion and New England Tableland Bioregion, New England Blackbutt - Tallowwood grassy forest of escarpment ranges of the NSW North Coast Bioregion and New England Tableland Bioregion, Round-leaved Gum tall open forest of the eastern New England Tableland Bioregion, Silvertop Stringybark - Messmate - Sydney Blue Gum moist shrub-grass tall open forest on ranges of the lower North Coast, Silvertop Stringybark - Tallowwood open forest of the escarpment ranges of the New England Tableland Bioregion and NSW North Coast Bioregion, Snow Gum - Mountain Gum - Mountain Ribbon Gum open forest on ranges of the NSW North Coast Bioregion and eastern New England Tableland Bioregion, Sydney Blue Gum - Silvertop Stringybark grassy open forest on ranges of the lower North Coast, Coast Grey Box - Mountain Grey Gum - stringybark moist shrubby open forest in coastal gullies, southern South East Corner Bioregion, Red Bloodwood - Blackbutt - Spotted Gum shrubby open forest on coastal foothills, southern Sydney Basin Bioregion, Spotted Gum - Blackbutt shrubby open forest on the coastal foothills, southern Sydney Basin Bioregion and northern South East Corner Bioregion, Spotted Gum - Grey Ironbark - Woollybutt grassy open forest on coastal flats, southern Sydney Basin Bioregion and South East Corner Bioregion, Spotted Gum - White Stringybark - Burrawang shrubby open forest on hinterland foothills, northern South East Corner Bioregion, Turpentine - Red Bloodwood - Sydney Peppermint shrubby open forest on the foothills, southern Sydney Basin Bioregion and northern South East Corner Bioregion, Deane's Gum - Mountain Grey Gum - Turpentine tall moist forest on shale, Sydney Basin Bioregion, Mountain Gum - Manna Gum open forest of the South Eastern Highlands Bioregion, Peppermint - Mountain Gum - Brown Barrel moist open forest of the South Eastern Highlands Bioregion, Snow Gum - Mountain Gum tussock grass-herb forest of the South Eastern Highlands Bioregion, Blackbutt - Narrow-leaved White Mahogany shrubby tall open forest of coastal ranges, northern Sydney Basin Bioregion, Blackbutt - Pink Bloodwood shrubby open forest of the coastal lowlands of the NSW North Coast Bioregion, Blackbutt - Turpentine - Sydney Blue Gum mesic tall open forest on ranges of the Central Coast, Blackbutt - Turpentine - Tallowwood shrubby open forest of the coastal foothills of the central NSW North Coast Bioregion, Blackbutt tall moist forest of the coastal ranges of the central and southern NSW North Coast Bioregion, Pink Bloodwood - Tallowwood moist open forest of the far northern ranges of the NSW North Coast Bioregion, Smooth-barked Apple - Turpentine - Blackbutt open forest on ranges of the Central Coast, Spotted Gum - Grey Ironbark shrubby open forest of the Richmond Range of the NSW North Coast, Sydney Blue Gum - Deane's Gum - River Peppermint shrubby riparian tall forest of the lower Colo River, Sydney Basin Bioregion, Sydney Blue Gum open forest on coastal foothills and escarpment of the North Coast, Turpentine - Smooth-barked Apple moist shrubby forest of the lower Blue Mountains, Sydney Basin Bioregion, Silvertop Stringybark - Round-leaved Gum open forest of the tableland edge of the New England Tableland Bioregion and NSW North Coast Bioregion, Narrow-leaved Peppermint - Sydney Peppermint - Brown Barrel tall fern forest in the Southern Highlands, Sydney Basin Bioregion, Narrow-leaved Peppermint - Sydney Peppermint - Gully Gum open forest/woodland in the Southern Highlands, Sydney Basin Bioregion, Sydney Peppermint - White Stringybark moist shrubby forest on elevated ridges, Sydney Basin Bioregion. 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