… Is it good for someone who is new to Mutual Funds or a beginner? The idea that a theoretically optimal portfolio must hold each geographical component at its market weight simply pushes me further than I would dream of being pushed. As he stresses: COSTS ARE FOREVER. Easy there John Bogle, save a few pats on your back for me! Since the first edition of Common Sense on Mutual Funds was published in 1999, much has changed, and no one is more aware of this than mutual fund pioneer John Bogle. I found his arguments concerning owning foreign stock interesting. Download "Common Sense On Mutual Funds Book Summary, by John C. Bogle" as PDF. Warren Buffet describes this book as “Cogent, honest, and hard–hitting–a must read for every investor.” This is the perfect book for a beginner as well as a … Since the first edition of Common Sense on Mutual Funds was published in 1999, much has changed, and no one is more aware of this than mutual fund pioneer John Bogle. Since the first edition of Common Sense on Mutual Funds was published in 1999, much has changed, and no one is more aware of this than mutual fund pioneer John Bogle. Now, in this completely updated Second Edition, Bogle returns to take another critical look at the mutual fund industry and help investors navigate their way through the staggering array of investment alternatives that are available to them. “This revolutionary pioneering book educated many of us boomers new to the financial services industry,” O’Donnell says. Now, in this completely updated Second Edition, Bogle returns to take another critical look at the mutual fund industry and help investors navigate their way … Author – John. It feels relevant and pertinent. It shared information that was pretty commonsense and that I've heard before (keep your costs low, invest simply, stay in it for the long haul, index funds are a good way to go, etc.). A very thorough blueprint for the individual investor. Municipal bond funds are fine choices for investors in high tax brackets, and inflation-protected bond funds are a sound option for those who believe that much higher living costs will result from the huge federal government deficits of this era. A very thorough blueprint for the individual investor. Bogle cites the research which says that actively managed funds very rarely can outpace the average (index) of the stock market due to the fees which eat into returns. C. Bogle. I enjoyed the voice of the author. This was an informative, interesting and ultimately extremely valuable book for anyone interested in building wealth for retirement thru a 401k, IRA or by investing in mutual funds. Written by the founder of Vanguard, it has completely changed the way I will approach investing for the next 30 years and has really opened my eyes about some of the downfalls of individual investing. Book Review: Common Sense on Mutual Funds. He explains his stance clearly in this book: it is the cost of advice and administration that consumes much of a managed mutual fund's return and that research effort doesn't exist in index funds. The index fund simply buys and holds the securities in a particular index, in proportion to their weight in the index. Around that number, risk remains fairly constant, all the way out to 30 funds (an unbelievable number! Not a beginners guide to investing. John Clifton "Jack" Bogle (born May 8, 1929) is the founder and retired CEO of The Vanguard Group. It provides a lot of information, in some ways overwhelming. Reading the newest version, the 10th anniversary edition, adds plentiful commentary, making this even longer. Now, in this completely updated Second Edition, Bogle returns to take another critical look at the mutual fund industry and help investors navigate their way through the staggering array of investment alternatives that are available to them. … Now, in this completely updated Second Edition, Bogle returns to take another critical look at the mutual fund industry and help investors navigate their way … recommended by WSB 11-19-2014, p B9, best books for investors. Foreign funds may reduce a portfolio’s volatility, but their economic and currency risks may reduce returns by a still larger amount. Great read for finance-interested people, which will likely turn you into a Bogle-head as well. Bogle on Mutual Funds gives investors the keys to adopting an effective asset allocation strategy, selecting appropriate mutual funds, and employing the savvy use of index funds. I'm … This book is a comprehensive review of what John Bogle thinks we should all be doing with our money as well as a commentary on the mutual fund industry. “Common Sense on Mutual Funds” by John Bogle is a substantial book. As the maturity date lengthens, volatility of principal increases, but volatility of income declines. Timely and timeless, this important audiobook examines the fundamentals of mutual fund investing in turbulent … After nearly 50 years in this business, I do not know of anybody who has done it successfully and consistently. Securing your financial future has never seemed more difficult, but you'll be a better investor for having read the Second Edition of Common Sense on Mutual Funds… John C. Bogle’s most popular book is The Intelligent Investor. 1 – Common Sense on Mutual Funds 2 – Mutual Funds for Dummies 3 – Bogle on Mutual Funds 4 – The Mutual Funds Book 5 – Mutual Fund Industry Handbook 6 – Mutual Funds for Beginners Book (The Investing Series 3) 7 – Investing for Beginners 8 – The Little Book of Common Sense Investing 9 – The Millennial Guide to Success in Mutual Fund Investing 10 – A Beginner’s Guide to Mutual Fund . Since the first edition of Common Sense on Mutual Funds was published in 1999, much has changed, and no one is more aware of this than mutual fund pioneer John Bogle. John C. Bogle shares his extensive insights on investing in mutual funds. He presented his information in a casual manner, although with quite a bit of repetition. This is not the book to read if you're looking for a primer on investing or retirement planning that includes Bogle's philosphy. Quotes By John C. Bogle. There are no discussion topics on this book yet. We must recognize the reality that they are in the business of investing other people’s money in order to maximize their own profits, even though those profits come at the expense of their fund shareholders.”, “for the stock market, corporate earnings and dividends; for the bond market, interest payments. John C. Bogle shares his extensive insights on investing in mutual funds. Since the first edition of Common Sense on Mutual Funds was published in 1999, much has changed, and no one is more aware of this than mutual fund pioneer John Bogle. My Money Blog has partnered with CardRatings and Credit-Land for selected credit cards, and may receive a commission from card issuers. Reply. Since the first edition of Common Sense on Mutual Funds was published in 1999, much has changed, and no one is more aware of this than mutual fund pioneer John Bogle. The book is well written and manages to stay interesting despite the fact that Bogle belabors the point, hammering home the core principles from every conceivable angle. Notify me of new posts by email. The last ten years, although totally unprecedented and unpredictable, have certainly borne him out. … By clearly laying out the four dimensions of investing (risk, reward, time, cost), Bogle makes a strong case for avoiding high-cost, actively managed mutual funds or funds which have high turnover or high speculation. Now, in this completely updated Second Edition, Bogle returns to take another … It is quite long. six − = Notify me of follow-up comments by email. (I explore the pros and cons of global investing in Chapter 8.) Even if you know the basics: invest for the long haul in super low cost funds indexed to major market indexes, there are certainly some more here that is practical. Now, in this completely updated Second Edition, Bogle returns to take another critical look at the mutual fund industry and help investors navigate their way … Our colleges, universities, and many other durable institutions have essentially unlimited time horizons.”, “The most popular form is based on: • Using a market index strategy, but emphasizing growth stocks and holding lower-yielding equities, in order to minimize the tax burden on income. John C. Bogle is an investing saint or an investing pariah according to who you ask. His advice for most investors, expounded here, is to invest in stock indices through low cost index funds. Bogle believes in investor discipline, long-term focus, diligent saving, and the use of passively-managed index funds. John C. Bogle shares his extensive insights on investing in mutual funds. Passively managed index funds are tax-efficient, given the low turnover implicit in the structure of the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index (and, to an even greater extent, the all-market Wilshire 5000 Index).”, “Gold is often sought as a refuge during times of financial travail. “The mutual fund industry has been built, in a sense, on witchcraft.”, “The index fund is a most unlikely hero for the typical investor. I don't even know anybody who knows anybody who has done it successfully and consistently.”, “The best-known stars are, of course, those funds awarded top five-star billing by Morningstar Mutual Funds.”, “But it is the long-term merits of the index fund—broad diversification, weightings paralleling those of the stocks that comprise the market, minimal portfolio turnover, and low cost—that commend it to wise investors. we suggest Common Sense on Mutual Funds. This book wasn't really earth shattering. (5) The greatest constant of all is that—given equivalent portfolio quality and maturity—lower costs mean higher returns. I listened to this on audio, and the problem with these update sections was that they were introduced by the narrator saying something like “Ten year update,” but there was no indication when the update was over and you were back listening to the original book. This is just one of the solutions for you to be successful. Since the first edition of Common Sense on Mutual Funds was published in 1999, much has changed, and no one is more aware of this than mutual fund pioneer John Bogle. “Jack was an original industry thought leader,” says John O’Donnell, Director of Research at Online Trading Academy, who calls The Little Book of Common Sense Investing one of his favorite books. Next: My fund of choice: Vanguard Target Retirement 2035 (VTTHX) Hi! And with this 10th anniversary edition, the author decided that every few pages (or minutes on the audiobook), he would break in with an update.